What Do YOU Think Are Best and Worst Super Bowl Ads Ever?

During the first 49 Super Bowls, there have been a lot of TV commercials presented, and billions of dollars spent on them. So, which of these commercials are considered the best and which the worst?
Before reading the experts’ choices, state what is your all-time favorite Super Bowl TV commercial and what is your least favorite. Why?

 

According to Judann Pollack, writing for Ad Age, these are the top 10 Super Bowl TV ads from games 1-49. Click the ad title to see it at YouTube; and click here to learn why these ads were chosen as the best:
  1. Apple, “1984.”
  2. Monster.com, “When I Grow Up.”
  3. Budweiser, “Respect.” (9/11 Tribute!)
  4. Coca-Cola, “Hilltop.”
  5. EDS, “Cat Herding.”
  6. Coca-Cola, “Mean Joe Greene.”
  7. Nike, “Hare Jordan.”
  8. Volkswagen, “The Force.”
  9. Ram Trucks, “Farmer.”
  10. Budweiser, “Whassup!?”

 

According to Kimberly Potts, reporting for Yahoo! TV, these are the worst Super Bowl TV ads from games 1-49. Click the ad title to see it at YouTube; and click here to learn why these ads were chosen as the worst:
  1. Groupon, “Save the Money – Tibet”
  2. GM, “Robot Commercial”
  3. SalesGenie.com, “Pandas”
  4. Go Daddy, “Body Paint: Danica Patrick & Jillian Michaels”
  5. Go Daddy, “Exposure: Danica Patrick”
  6. Miller, “Evil Beavers vs. Miller Lite”
  7. Pepsi, “King’s Court with Elton John”
  8. Go Daddy, “Perfect Match with Bar Refaeli”
  9. Teleflora, “Adriana Lima”
  10. Bridgestone Tires, Alice Cooper & Richard Simmons”

 

Posted in Part 3: Targeting Customers and Gathering Information, Part 7: Communicating with the Customer, Social Media and Retailing, Video Clips (non-career) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Price Shopping Online Before Visiting the Store

As we have reported before (click here, for example), even when consumers shop in a store, most U.S. Internet users use the Internet for pre-store shopping — especially to see what the best prices are.
eMarketer sums up the situation nicely:
“According to Salesforce and the Harris Poll, about eight in 10 U.S. Internet users surveyed in October 2015 compared prices digitally before making a purchase in a store. And online-only retailers are the No. 1 source of product research that ultimately leads to an in-store purchase: 56% of Internet users said they compared product prices on pure-play E-commerce sites before making a purchase in a store.”

 
Posted in Online Retailing, Part 1: Overview/Planning, Part 2: Ownership, Strategy Mix, Online, Nontraditional, Part 3: Targeting Customers and Gathering Information, Part 4: Store Location Planning, Part 5: Managing a Retail Business, Part 6: Merchandise Management and Pricing, Part 7: Communicating with the Customer, Part 8: Putting It All Together, Strategy Mix | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Many Retailers Lacking in Social Media Responsiveness

Millions of retailers have a social media presence — and are active with their own postings. BUT, and this is a big but, many are not responsive enough to social media comments made by customers and non-customers. They are especially weak in responsiveness to Twitter tweets.
As reported by eMarketer:
“In Q3, 2015, Eptica examined customer service metrics on Facebook and Twitter across various retail sectors. On Facebook, jewelry retailers had the highest response rate to questions, at 80%, while toy and hobby retailers were least likely to respond, at 46%.”
“The same study on Twitter found that health and beauty retailers had the highest response rate, at 41%. Food and drug retailers were on the other end of the spectrum, answering just 14% of questions posed to them on Twitter.”
And, according to the Eptica study, even when retailers responded to tweets, the questions were not necessarily answered correctly. Click the chart to read more. 

 

 

Posted in Part 1: Overview/Planning, Part 2: Ownership, Strategy Mix, Online, Nontraditional, Part 3: Targeting Customers and Gathering Information, Part 5: Managing a Retail Business, Part 6: Merchandise Management and Pricing, Part 7: Communicating with the Customer, Social Media and Retailing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Don’t Be Perceived as a Job Hopper

Have you had a lot of jobs in your career? If you are perceived as a “job hopper,” some companies won’t consider you for a job opening no matter how strong your resume.
Why can this be a big negative in your job search?
As Don Goodman observes for Careerealism:
“When an employer scans your resume for 20 seconds, what will they see? If you have had a series of jobs lasting 1-2 years, then you may look like a job hopper and these are big red flags on your resume. Securing a candidate takes time and money for employers, so a candidate who has a record of job hopping does not leave a positive impression and sways employers to move on to consider other candidates instead. Short periods of employment generally indicate that you were terminated due to lack of performance and that is not the impression you want to convey.” [or that you are much too restless when you’re at a given job and move on to the next short-lived opportunity.]
Here are four tips from Goodman:
  1. Company Changes — “When the reason you leave the job is because of structural changes within a company or the company closes down, these are situations that are not within your control and should not be cause for you to appear like a job hopper on your resume. Whether you were laid off, the company moved out of state, or went out of business, indicate that as a brief note on your resume next to your dates of employment.
  2. Consulting And Temporary Assignments — “One way to handle this is to pull all these experiences together into one pool on your resume. You may indicate on your resume ‘Consultant’ and specify the full length of time you were in the role. Underneath this section, highlight the companies and/or specific experiences and accomplishments in the role. An employer will view all the individual experiences and temporary assignments – and its significance in furthering your career experiences – as a whole.
  3. Reformatting Dates of Employment — “Rather than listing the specific month and year you were employed with an employer, indicate only the year. It can appear less obvious that you were only on the job for 16 months, and appear more like two years.
  4. Demonstrate Past Contributions and Accomplishments — “There is little you can do to change the amount of time you were on certain jobs, but what you can do is divert the focus to your contributions and accomplishments on the job. Even if you were on the job for under a year, highlight significant contributions you made to show outstanding performance on the job. Employers care about and are impressed by candidates good at what they do and who are effective on the job; even if you only had a short period of time in the role.”
 
Click Goodman’s photo to read more.


 

Posted in Career Useful Information, Careers in Retailing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Receipts Can Provide Big Data

Retailers have a great data resource that may be underutilized and underanalyzed: the ordinary E-mail receipt.
Take a look at this infographic created by Receiptful.

What We Learned from Sending 100K Email Receipts

 From Visually.

 

Posted in Part 3: Targeting Customers and Gathering Information, Part 5: Managing a Retail Business, Technology in Retailing | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Global Retail Logistics: An Infographic

In today’s retail supply chain, global logistics has become a much more important activity to optimize.
As Mike O’Brien reports for Multichannel Merchant:
“With the rapid growth in E-commerce here and across the world, global retail logistics have become more complex and merchant companies are challenged to keep up. This infographic from 2Flow details the impact E-commerce has had on logistics and distribution networks in both established and emerging markets.”
Click the infographic for a larger view.


 

 

Posted in Global Retailing, Part 1: Overview/Planning, Part 2: Ownership, Strategy Mix, Online, Nontraditional, Part 5: Managing a Retail Business, Part 6: Merchandise Management and Pricing, Technology in Retailing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Four 2016 Video Forecasts by TIAA-CREF’s Chief Economist

TIAA-CREF, the full-service investment firm that manages nearly $835 billion in assets, recently produced a series of short videos about the year ahead (2016) featuring its Chief Economist Tim Hopper. 
1. The U.S. economy should accelerate modestly this year.
2. Fed rate hikes could stimulate economic growth this year.
3. The U.S. economy is on a path toward sustainable growth in 2016.
4. China’s slowdown puts a damper on global growth.

 

Posted in Global Retailing, Part 1: Overview/Planning, Part 3: Targeting Customers and Gathering Information, Part 5: Managing a Retail Business, Part 7: Communicating with the Customer, Video Clips (non-career) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment