Free Advertising Tools

In this post, we cite free advertising tools for small businesses. By using these tools, a firm can hold down its costs. And it can advertise more effectively.

Because we like free, also consult these other resources:

 

FOURTEEN Free Advertising Tools for Small Businesses

According to Caroline Forsey, writing for HubSpot:

“When you work at a small business with a limited budget, it’s not really possible to shell out $340,000 for a 30-second TV commercial,. Or even $10,000 for an E-mail marketing campaign. Thus, it can be frustrating when your budget dictates how many people your business can reach.”

“But surprisingly, we can turn to a lot of free ways to supplement our paid advertising efforts. By incorporating free advertising tactics into your strategy, you can remove some nonessential costs. And you can dedicate your budget to deeper, more long-term plays. In fact, we suggest some of these methods regardless of your budget. To help you spread the word about your business without breaking the bank, we’ve compiled 14 ways to get advertising for free.”

Click here for an in-depth discussion of the tips listed below.

Free Advertising Tools for Small Businesses -- From Hubspot

In addition, HubSpot offers a free E-book on 20 outstanding marketing and advertising campaigns:

“We’ve compiled our own list of the top marketing and advertising campaigns ever. And we and include a few juicy details explaining what made each campaign so remarkable. Thus, you’ll learn strategies you can use as inspiration for your next marketing initiative. Examples include: Interactive ads that are easy to share, like Office Max’s ‘Elf Yourself’ E-cards. Showing gratitude for your customers with a surprise ending, such as Cardstone’s ‘World’s Toughest Job’ video. Content that creates a movement for a good cause, for example ‘Small Business Saturday’ by American Express. And many more!”

Click the book cover to access the free signup and download.

Best Marketing and Advertising Campaigns
 

This entry was posted in Part 3: Targeting Customers and Gathering Information, Part 7: Communicating with the Customer, Social Media and Retailing and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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